Prayer 7:13 Prayer 713
North Highland United Methodist Church
Tuesday, May 22, 2018
Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors

August 2010 Column

 
 
READING SCRIPTURE AS A SPIRITUAL DISCIPLINE
AUGUST 2010
 
This exercise broadens one’s “hearing” scripture. Choose a passage. Take one of your favorites.
Then read it from at least 3 translations.
Which one do you prefer? Which one did you like the least?
What did you hear like you have never before heard?
If you have a computer it is as easy as a click of your mouse to find as many translations as you would like.
I use Google. I type the passage and the translation, Romans 14:1-4 NRSV, and there it is!
Read these three translations.
 
· Romans 14:1-4 (NRSV)
1 Welcome those who are weak in faith, but not for the purpose of quarreling over opinions. 2 Some believe in eating anything while the weak eat only vegetables. 3 Those who eat must not despise those who abstain, and those who abstain must not pass judgment on those who eat; for God has welcomed them 4 Who are you to pass judgment on servants of another? It is before their own lord that they stand or fall. And they will be upheld, for the Lord is able to make them stand.
 
· Romans 14:1-4 (King James)
1 Accept him whose faith is weak, without passing judgment on disputable matters. 2 One man's faith allows him to eat everything, but another man, whose faith is weak, eats only vegetables. 3 The man who eats everything must not look down on him who does not, and the man who does not eat everything must not condemn the man who does, for God has accepted him. 4 Who are you to judge someone else's servant? To his own master he stands or falls. And he will stand, for the Lord is able to make him stand.
 
· Romans 14:1-4 (THE MESSAGE)
1 Welcome with open arms fellow believers who don't see things the way you do. And don't jump all over them every time they do or say something you don't agree with—even when it seems that they are strong on opinions but weak in the faith department. Remember, they have their own history to deal with. Treat them gently. 2-4 For instance, a person who has been around for a while might well be convinced that he can eat anything on the table, while another, with a different background, might assume he should only be a vegetarian and eat accordingly. But since both are guests at Christ's table, wouldn't it be terribly rude if they fell to criticizing what the other ate or didn't eat? God, after all, invited them both to the table. Do you have any business crossing people off the guest list or interfering with God's welcome? If there are corrections to be made or manners to be learned, God can handle that without your help.